Publishing in Dynamis

Publishing in Dynamis

Original article

Original papers should be submitted electronically through the platform RECyT. The first page of the manuscript (title page) should contain the name and affiliation of all authors and the name and address of the corresponding author. It is recommended not to exceed 8,500 words or 56,000 characters (with spaces), including notes. Papers should include an abstract of around 300 words and five key words, written in the paper’s original language and English. Authors should provide their ORCID code.

Special issues

Dynamis devotes part of each volume to single issues of historiographic relevance and current interest. Proposals should be sent to the journal, indicating the topic and the papers/studies that would comprise the special issue, accompanied by a short statement in support of the proposal and a brief curriculum of its guest editor. Special issues should preferably contain a minimum of 4 original articles and a maximum of 7 (following the guidelines for articles above), preceded by an introduction by the guest editors. Authors should provide their ORCID code.

Dynamis Dynamis only publishes original articles that have not been published or accepted by another publication and are not under review elsewhere. The maximum length of the manuscript is 8,500 words or 56,000 characters (with spaces), including notes. The manuscripts should be submitted electronically through the RECyT platform. The first page (title page) should contain the title, authors, affiliation of each author and e-mail address of the corresponding author. The article title should not exceed 120 characters (with spaces). The authors should also provide a summary (with numbered sections), abstract (around 300 words), and five key words with their respective translations into English. The origin or funding of the research should be declared in an unnumbered footnote indicated with an asterisk in the title of the Introduction section.

Acknowledgements should be made in a separate section at the end of the article. As a general rule, the texts submitted to Dynamis should be linguistically correct and concisely written using non-discriminatory language. The typographic and style criteria below should be followed to facilitate the publishing process:

1. Typography

1.1 Page. Originals should be printed on one side of A4 pages (210 x 297 mm) and numbered (1, 2, 3…) in the upper right corner.

1.2 Margins. The top margin should be 4 cm and bottom and side margins 3 cm.

1.3 Typeface and font. As a general criterion, only one typeface and one font size should be used, e.g., 12-point Times New Roman. Boldface and underlining should not be used in the main body of the text. The use of italics is permitted for words in a language different from that of the text, for special emphasis, or for book and journal titles cited in the text. If other typographic fonts are needed for mathematical signs or texts in other alphabets (e.g., Greek), their position should be indicated on one of the printed originals to avoid omissions in subsequent conversions.

1.4 Paragraph. CAs a general rule, the first line of the paragraph should be indented, serving to indicate a new paragraph. Therefore, it is not necessary to leave blank lines between paragraphs. The first line of each subtitled section (including the first line of the text) should not be indented. The remaining lines should be justified (aligned to left and right margins) and separated with an interlinear space of 1.5. 

1.5 Titles and subtitles. Numbering and boldface and italic are used to clarify the text structure (subdivisions and hierarchies), as shown in the example below. Titles and subtitles do not have full stops and only the first letter is in uppercase (except for proper names). Underlining and small capitals should also be avoided.

Article title
1. Section title
1.1 Subsection title
1.1.1 Title of first subdivision

1.6 Direct quotes. Direct quotes longer than two lines should be written in a separate indented paragraph. Shorter quotes should be included in the paragraph using inverted commas (see below).
If the selected text corresponds to a fragment of a phrase, the initial letter should be kept in lowercase; if it is a complete phrase, it should start with a capital letter and double indentation. 
References to specific passages in a paper should give the page(s) on which it appears in parentheses at the end of the reference.

1.7 Footnotes. Notes should serve to clarify aspects of the text, demonstrate what is stated or present the sources; they should not constitute a parallel discourse to the text or provide an exhaustive bibliographic account. Notes should be numbered according to the sequence of their appearance. The number that identifies them should be in superscript format within the text body after the closing of any inverted commas and before any comma, semicolon or full stop that ends the phrase. If MS WORD is used, its options for notes (footnotes or endnotes) can be used. If another programme is used, notes should appear after the text in a final section that is clearly identified or submitted in a separate file. In the journal they will be printed as footnotes.

1.8 Bibliograhic references and citation systmes. Dynamis follows Chicago Manual of Style (Notes and Bibliography). Please refer to examples below.

1.9 Acknowledgements. As indicated above, acknowledgements to institutions and citations of projects or grants should be included in footnotes, before note 1, indicated by an asterisk [e.g., at the end of the title of the Introduction (*)] and not as note 1. Other types of acknowledgements and intellectual debts should be included as an unnumbered subsection at the end of the paper with the heading Acknowledgements.

1.10 Tables, graphs, maps and figures. They should be numbered according to their order of appearance and identified in the text. The title is centred and in boldface above tables. An accompanying legend at the foot of the table should specify the source of data. In general, vertical lines should not be used in tables.   Graphs, maps and figures should be in JPG or TIFF format with a quality of at least 300 megapixels. Numbering, legends and sources are placed below them. Graphs and charts are published in black and white. Maps and figures should be submitted in a separate file.

2. Orthography

2.1 Generic othographic signs

    1. Quotation marks. «French» quotation marks are used in Dynamis, using Alt 174 (on number pad) to open and Alt 175 to close (they do not appear on the keyboard). “English” quotation marks are only used for quotations appearing in a text that is already within quotation marks, e.g. «To feed the “brothers of Jesus Christ, the needy poor”, attendants provided the standard Byzantine fare of bread, wine and dried or fresh cooked vegetables dressed with olive oil».
    2. Hyphens. Two types of hyphens are used. The small hyphen (-) found on the keyboard is used to unite two words, to indicate opposition or contrast, and for ranges of numbers or dates (1999-2001). The long hyphen (—), obtained by pressing Alt + Ctrl, is used in dialogues and can also have the function of brackets. 2.1.3. Upper case Upper case letters are not systematically used for the titles of books, chapters or articles (except for “of”, “in”, “the”, etc.).
    3. Upper case. Upper case letters are not systematically used for the titles of books, chapters or articles (except for “of”, “in”, “the”, etc.).
    4. Brackets ( ) and square brackets [ ]. Brackets are used to isolate an observation distinct from the object of discourse, to interpose dates or to give the full wording of abbreviations or acronyms. Within a direct quote, brackets around an ellipsis (…) indicate the omission of a phrase. Square brackets are generally reserved for use by the Editor, e.g., for insertion of editorial comments or text not in the original. Within a direct quote, square brackets are used to indicate the absence of a complete paragraph […].

2.2 Ortographic punctuation marks

    1. Comma (,), stop (.), semicolon (;) y dos colon (:). These marks are always followed by a blank space. See above for their relationship with superscript footnote numbers.
    2. Exclamation and question marks (! ?) and ellipses (…). When a phrase ends in an exclamation or question mark or an ellipsis, a full stop should not be added. Within a direct quote, the replacement of a whole paragraph with an ellipsis is marked with square brackets […] and the replacement of a phrase with normal brackets (…). These should not be placed at the beginning or end of a direct quote.
    3. Stroke (slash) (/). No space should be left between the stroke and adjoining characters except when used to mark a line change in verses.

3. Abbreviations and symbols

If the use of abbreviations are essential in the body of the text (the word in full is always preferable), they should be explained in the text or in the footnotes on their first appearance. Common abbreviations should always be followed by a full stop, but those that correspond to  scientific or technical symbols should not be followed by full stop or used in plural form (e.g., N, He, km and $, for North, helium, kilometres and dollars, respectively).

Some common abbreviations in our setting are: 
editor/s:  ed./eds.
compiler/s: comp./comps.
director/s: dir./dirs.
page/s: p.
folio/s: f.
document/s: doc.

4. Acronyms and initials

Acronyms do not contain full stops or spaces and are written in uppercase (UN, OAS). Some acronyms that have become common names are written in lowercase (e.g., laser). Acronyms are treated as proper names. Initials have a full stop after each letter. Except for widely accepted and well-known acronyms, these should be written in full in the text or footnotes on their first appearance.

5. Numbers and dates

In the body of the text, single-digit numbers are written as words, using numbers from two digits onwards. Nonetheless, round numbers can be written in words (ten thousand pesetas) or in mixed form (10 thousand pesetas) to avoid groups of zeros (10,000 pesetas). If an amount is given as an approximation, it should be written in words (e.g., around fifteen years). Dates are written according to the corresponding norm in the language used (e.g., UK English: 11 July 1988). Years are written in numbers (1980), and decades in words, e.g., “the eighties” or “the decade of the eighties”.

Dynamis follows Chicago Manual of Style (Notes and Bibliography). The references should be placed in footnotes. Authors should add a final bibliography. 

Sample references:

Book

Note:

Laura Kelly, Irish Women in Medicine, c- 1880s-1990s: Origins, Education and Careers (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015).

Shortened note:

Kelly, Irish Women in Medicine, 134.

Bibliography entry:

Kelly, Laura. Irish Women in Medicine, c- 1880s-1990s: Origins, Education and Careers Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2015.

Book chapter

Note:

Teresa Ortiz Gómez, “Mujeres y hombres en la historia de la medicina,” in Medicina, historia y género. 130 años de investigación feminista (Oviedo: KRK, 2006), 215-225.

Rosa Ballester Añón, “España y la Organización Mundial de la Salud. La cuestión española y la puesta en marcha de políticas y programas de salud pública (1948-1970),” in Salud, enfermedad y medicina en el Franquismo, eds. María Isabel Porras Gallo, Lourdes Mariño Gutiérrez, and María Victoria Caballero Martínez (Madrid: Los Libros de la Catarata, 2019), 43-56.

Shortened note:

Ortiz Gómez, “Mujeres y hombres,” 225.

Balleter Añon, “España y la Organización Mundial de la Salud,” 44.

Bibliography entry:

Ortiz Gómez, Teresa. “Mujeres y hombres en la historia de la medicina,” in Medicina, historia y género. 130 años de investigación feminista, 215-225. Oviedo: KRK, 2006.

Ballester Añón, Rosa B. “España y la Organización Mundial de la Salud. La cuestión española y la puesta en marcha de políticas y programas de salud pública (1948-1970).”  In Salud, enfermedad y medicina en el Franquismo, edited by María Isabel Porras Gallo, Lourdes Mariño Gutiérrez, and María Victoria Caballero Martínez, 43-56. Madrid: Los Libros de la Catarata, 2019.

Journal article

Note:

Cassia Roth, “The Degenerating Sex: Female Sterilization, Medical Authority and Racial Purity in Catholic Brazil,” Medical History 64, no. 2 (2020): 173-194, https://doi.org/10.1017/mdh.2020.2

Shortened note:

Roth, “The Degenerating Sex,” 174.

Bibliography entry:

Roth, Cassia. “The Degenerating Sex: Female Sterilization, Medical Authority and Racial Purity in Catholic Brazil.” Medical History 64, no. 2 (2020): 173-194. https://doi.org/10.1017/mdh.2020.2

Magazine article

Note:

Santiago Dexeus, “¿Cuando luz verde a la contracepción,” Triunfo, Feb 14, 1976, 34-37.

“Problemas sanitarios hasta que no se cumplan los puntos reivindicados,” Diario de Murcia, Nov 13, 1981, 18.

Shortened note:

Dexeus, “Cuando luz verde,” 37.

“Problemas sanitarios.”

Bibliography entry::

Dexeus, Santiago. “¿Cuando luz verde a la contracepción.” Triunfo, Feb 14, 1976, 34-37.

“Problemas sanitarios hasta que no se cumplan los puntos reivindicados.” Diario de Murcia, Nov 13, 1981, 18.

Website

Note:

Kylie Smith, “Moving Beyond Florence: Why We Need to Decolonise Nursing History,” Nursing Clio, accessed May 14, 2020, https://nursingclio.org/2021/02/04/moving-beyond-florence-why-we-need-to-decolonize-nursing-history/

Shortened note:

Smith, “Moving Beyond Florence.”

Bibliography entry:

Smith, Kylie. “Moving Beyond Florence: Why We Need to Decolonise Nursing History.” Accessed May 14, 2020. https://nursingclio.org/2021/02/04/moving-beyond-florence-why-we-need-to-decolonize-nursing-history/

Audiovisual material

Note:

Margaret Lazarus, Renner Wunderlich, and Joan Finck, dirs., Taking Our Bodies Back (1974; Cambridge: Cambridge Documentary Films).

Shortened note:

Lazarus, Wunderlich and Finck, Taking Our Bodies Back.

Bibliography entry::

Lazarus, Margaret; Renner Wunderlich, and Joan Finck, directors. Taking Our Bodies Back 1974; Cambridge: Cambridge Documentary Films.

Interview

Note:

Maggie Jones, interviewed by the author, Sep 8, 2010.

Shortened note:

Jones.

Las entrevistas normalmente no se incluyen en listado bibliográfico final.

Thesis

Note:

Angelica Fajardo Alcántara, “El proceso de especialización en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria en España,” (Phd. Diss, Universidad de Granada, 2007), 11-13.

Shortened note:

Fajardo, “El proceso de especialización,” 22.

Bibliography entry:

Fajardo Alcántara, Angelica. “El proceso de especialización en Medicina Familiar y Comunitaria en España.” Phd. Diss, Universidad de Granada, 2007.

Archival documents

As a general rule, the authors should provide the following information: document, date, reference, collection, archive and its location. The archival documents are not listed in the final bibliography.

Note:

Govern de l’Hospital, 1401-1929, sección 1/15, 30 legajos, Administració de l’Establiment, Arxiu de l’Hospital de Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España.

Sebastiano dall’Aquila, Questio de putrescente sanguine, ms. G.II.3, f. 69r-90r, Biblioteca Nazionale, Turín, Italia.

Carta de César Borgia a Ercole d’Este, Oct 10, 1501, caja 19, doc. 58, Medici e Medicina, Archivio Segretto Estense, Archivio di Stato di Modena; Modena, Italia.

Juan de Angulo, Súplica a Duque de Pastrana, Oct 4, 1692, legajo 689, doc. 34, Archivo General de Palacio, Madrid, España.

Solicitud del doctor Juan Bautista Arechederreta para establecer un seminario de medicina en México, Jul 17, 1804, cuarta división, no. 22, Fondo «Real Expedición Botánica a Nueva España. Sessé y Mociño» (1787-1819), Archivo del Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid, España

President of the Mandates Commission to the Secretary General, 17 September 1923, R61/31174/22290, League of Nations Archives, United Nations Library and Archives, Geneva, Switzerland.

Shortened note:

Govern de l’Hospital.

Dall’Aquila, Questio

Carta de César Borgia

Juan de Angulo, Súplica

Solicitud del doctor Juan Bautista Arechederreta

President of the Mandates Commission to the Secretary General.